HR news round-up – Tuesday 29 August 2017

By August 29, 2017News

Good afternoon! Here’s your round-up of today’s human resources and employment law news.

Companies must reveal pay disparity between boss and workers – The Guardian

The government has announced that publicly listed companies will be obliged to publish the pay ratio between their chief executive and their average worker. The plans will come into force next June, and aim to give workers a voice at boardroom level.

The new laws will require the companies to justify the pay difference, and explain changes to their pay ratio from year to year. Listed companies which have faced regular shareholder opposition over top-level pay will also be included on a new public register.

The plans follow Theresa May’s pledge last year when running for the Conservative party leadership to have workers represented on company boards. However, Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the TUC have criticised the plans for not going far enough.

Four new public sector returnships announced – HR Magazine

Four new government schemes aiming to get people back into work are due to be launched this October.

The government’s returnship programme – hinted at in last year’s budget – will provide training and support by employers for people who have taken a career break and are looking to return to employment.

The programme will begin with schemes for civil servants, social workers, allied health professionals and teachers, and are intended to help develop best practice examples for other organisations to learn from.

Photography exhibition to focus on health and safety at work – HR News

The People’s History Museum in Manchester will host a free exhibition of photographs highlighting the importance of health and safety at work.

The 12 photographs were chosen as the finalists of the Focus: on Safety at Work competition held by national trade union law firm Thompsons Solicitors, who sponsor the museum. The exhibition runs from Thursday 31 August until Monday 4 September.